Tibetan Buddhism – Mahayana – Vajrayana-Mantrayāna-Tantrayana – Tantric Buddhist Vehicle

Tibetan Buddhism – Mahayana – Vajrayana-Mantrayāna-Tantrayana – Tantric Buddhist Vehicle

See also Vajrayana – Vajrayāna वज्रयान – Mantrayāna-Tantrayana – Tantric Buddhism Secret Mantra Diamond Vehicle – Tibetan rdo-rje theg-pa – Mìjiao – Mìzōng Esoteric Tradition – Tiếng Việt: Kim cương thừa

Fair Use Sources: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vajrayana

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Buddhism Glossary, Three Refuges: 1. Buddhas, 2. Dharma: SutrasShastrasVinayaTantras, Buddhist Bibliography, 3. Sangha: BodhisattvasHistoric Buddhist MastersModern Buddhist Masters

5th Dalai Lama – Ngawang Lobsang Gyatso – Tibetan ངག་དབང་བློ་བཟང་རྒྱ་མཚོ་ Ngag-dbang blo-bzang rgya-mtsho ཏཱ་ལའི་བླ་མ་ Tā la’i bla ma

5th Dalai Lama – Ngawang Lobsang Gyatso (Tibetan: ངག་དབང་བློ་བཟང་རྒྱ་མཚོ་, Wylie: Ngag-dbang blo-bzang rgya-mtsho; Tibetan pronunciation: [ŋɑ̀wɑ̀ŋ lɔ́psɑ̀ŋ cɑ̀t͡só]; 1617–1682) was the 5th Dalai Lama and the first Dalai Lama to wield effective temporal and spiritual power over all Tibet. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/5th_Dalai_Lama

“Dalai Lama (UK/ˈdælaɪ ˈlɑːmə/US/ˈdɑːlaɪ ˈlɑːmə/;[1][2] Standard Tibetan: ཏཱ་ལའི་བླ་མ་, Tā la’i bla ma, [táːlɛː láma]) is a title given by the Tibetan people for the foremost spiritual leader of the Gelug or “Yellow Hat” school of Tibetan Buddhism, the newest of the classical schools of Tibetan Buddhism.[3]The 14th and current Dalai Lama is Tenzin Gyatso.

The Dalai Lama is also considered to be the successor in a line of tulkus who are believed[2] to be incarnations of Avalokiteśvara,[1] a Bodhisattva of Compassion.[4][5] The name is a combination of the Mongolic word dalai meaning “ocean” or “big” (coming from Mongolian title Dalaiyin qan or Dalaiin khan,[6] translated as Gyatso in Tibetan)[7] and the Tibetan word བླ་མ་ (bla-ma) meaning “master, guru”.[8]

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Buddhism Glossary, Three Refuges: 1. Buddhas, 2. Dharma: SutrasShastrasVinayaTantras, Buddhist Bibliography, 3. Sangha: BodhisattvasHistoric Buddhist MastersModern Buddhist Masters

Dalai Lama – Tibetan ཏཱ་ལའི་བླ་མ་ Tā la’i bla ma

See also with 5th Dalai Lama – Ngawang Lobsang Gyatso (Tibetan: ངག་དབང་བློ་བཟང་རྒྱ་མཚོ་, WylieNgag-dbang blo-bzang rgya-mtsho; Tibetan pronunciation: [ŋɑ̀wɑ̀ŋ lɔ́psɑ̀ŋ cɑ̀t͡só]; 1617–1682) was the 5th Dalai Lama and the first Dalai Lama to wield effective temporal and spiritual power over all Tibet. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/5th_Dalai_Lama

“Dalai Lama (UK/ˈdælaɪ ˈlɑːmə/US/ˈdɑːlaɪ ˈlɑːmə/;[1][2] Standard Tibetan: ཏཱ་ལའི་བླ་མ་, Tā la’i bla ma, [táːlɛː láma]) is a title given by the Tibetan people for the foremost spiritual leader of the Gelug or “Yellow Hat” school of Tibetan Buddhism, the newest of the classical schools of Tibetan Buddhism.[3]The 14th and current Dalai Lama is Tenzin Gyatso.

The Dalai Lama is also considered to be the successor in a line of tulkus who are believed[2] to be incarnations of Avalokiteśvara,[1] a Bodhisattva of Compassion.[4][5] The name is a combination of the Mongolic word dalai meaning “ocean” or “big” (coming from Mongolian title Dalaiyin qan or Dalaiin khan,[6] translated as Gyatso in Tibetan)[7] and the Tibetan word བླ་མ་ (bla-ma) meaning “master, guru”.[8]

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Buddhism Glossary, Three Refuges: 1. Buddhas, 2. Dharma: SutrasShastrasVinayaTantras, Buddhist Bibliography, 3. Sangha: BodhisattvasHistoric Buddhist MastersModern Buddhist Masters

Kadam sect of Tibetan Vajrayana Buddhism tradition – Tibetan bKa’-gdams – Atisha Ga-dam school lineage – 噶当派 Gá dāng pài

New Kadam sect of Tibetan Vajrayana Buddhism tradition – Tibetan bKa’-gdams – Atisha Ga-dam school lineage – 噶当派 Gá dāng pài

“One of the New Translation Period traditions of Tibetan Buddhism, deriving from Atisha’s visit to Tibet. After its branches were merged and reformed, it continued as the Gelugpa tradition.” Fair Use Source: https://studybuddhism.com/en/glossary/kadam

The Kadam school (Tibetan: བཀའ་གདམས་པ་, Wyliebka’ gdams pa) of Tibetan Buddhism was founded by Dromtön (1005–1064), a Tibetan lay master and the foremost disciple of the great Bengali master Atiśa(982-1054). The Kadampa were quite famous and respected for their proper and earnest Dharmapractice. The most evident teachings of that tradition were the teachings on bodhicitta. Later, these special presentations became known as lojong and lamrim by Atiśa.

Kadam instructional influence lingered long after the school disappeared:

The Bka’ gdams was responsible for the distinctive Tibetan Bstan rim (tenrim) (“stages of teaching”) genre, based on Atiśa’s seminal work, the Bodhipathapradīpa. This genre was later adapted and popularized by Tsong kha pa in his influential Lam rim chen mo.[1]

Fair Use Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kadam_(Tibetan_Buddhism)

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Buddhism Glossary, Three Refuges: 1. Buddhas, 2. Dharma: SutrasShastrasVinayaTantras, Buddhist Bibliography, 3. Sangha: BodhisattvasHistoric Buddhist MastersModern Buddhist Masters

Vajrayana – Vajrayāna वज्रयान – Mantrayāna-Tantrayana – Tantric Buddhism Secret Mantra Diamond Vehicle – Mìjiao – Mìzōng Esoteric Tradition – Việt Kim cương thừa

Vajrayana – Vajrayāna वज्रयान – Mantrayāna-Tantrayana – Tantric Buddhism Secret Mantra Diamond Vehicle – Tibetan rdo-rje theg-pa – Mìjiao – Mìzōng Esoteric Tradition – Tiếng Việt: Kim cương thừa

Vajrayāna (वज्रयान), MantrayānaTantrayānaTantric Buddhism and Esoteric Buddhism Tantra and “Secret Mantra” – Mìjiao (Esoteric Teaching), Mìzōng (“Esoteric Tradition”)

Vajrayāna (वज्रयान), MantrayānaTantrayānaTantric Buddhism and Esoteric Buddhism are terms referring to the various Buddhist traditions of Tantra and “Secret Mantra“, which developed in medieval India and spread to TibetBhutan, and East Asia. In Tibet, Buddhist Tantra is termed Vajrayāna, while in China it is generally known as Tángmì Hanmi 漢密 (唐密, “Chinese Esotericism”) or Mìzōng (密宗, “Esoteric Sect”), in Pali it is known as Pyitsayãna (ပစ္စယာန) , and in Japan it is known as Mikkyō (密教, “secret teachings”).

Vajrayāna is usually translated as Diamond Vehicle or Thunderbolt Vehicle, referring to the Vajra, a mythical weapon which is also used as a ritual implement.

Founded by medieval Indian Mahāsiddhas, Vajrayāna subscribes to the literature known as the Buddhist Tantras.[1] It includes practices that make use of mantrasdharanismudrasmandalas and the visualization of deities and Buddhas. According to Vajrayāna scriptures, the term Vajrayāna refers to one of three vehicles or routes to enlightenment, the other two being the Śrāvakayāna (also known as the Hīnayāna) and Mahāyāna.

Fair Use Sources: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vajrayana

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Buddhism Glossary, Three Refuges: 1. Buddhas, 2. Dharma: SutrasShastrasVinayaTantras, Buddhist Bibliography, 3. Sangha: BodhisattvasHistoric Buddhist MastersModern Buddhist Masters

Gelug lineage of Tibetan Vajrayana Buddhism – Gelugpa-Gelukpa – New Kadam sect – Nalanda tradition དགེ་ལུགས་པ་ dGe-lugs – 格魯派 Gélǔ Pài / 黃教 Huáng Jiào Yellow Hats

Gelug lineage of Tibetan Vajrayana Buddhism – Gelugpa-Gelukpa – New Kadam sect – Nalanda tradition དགེ་ལུགས་པ་ Wylie dGe-lugs – 格魯派 Pinyin Gélǔ Pài / 黃教 Huáng Jiào Yellow Hats

Other Languages: Deutsch: Gelug, Italiano: Ghelug, Русский: Гелуг, Tiếng Việt: Phái cách-lỗ

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Buddhism Glossary, Three Refuges: 1. Buddhas, 2. Dharma: SutrasShastrasVinayaTantras, Buddhist Bibliography, 3. Sangha: BodhisattvasHistoric Buddhist MastersModern Buddhist Masters

Venerable Dhakpa Tulku Rinpoche

Year of Birth: AD

Year of Passing into Parinirvana: February 13th 2016.

Venerable Dhakpa Tulku Rinpoche sadly passed away on February 13th 2016.  He was the recognized reincarnation (Tulku) of 49th Gaden Tripa Lobsang Dhargye Rinpoche, who was the head of the Geluk tradition of Tibetan Buddhism. 

Shelo Dolma gave birth to Ven. Dhakpa Rinpoche in 1926 in Kongpo in southern Tibet. When he was five years old he was recognized as the reincarnation of the 49th Gaden Tripa by His Holiness the 13th Dalai Lama. Soon after his recognition he was sent to Lhasa for his enthronement, accompanied by his parents and his assistants from his previous lifetime. 

He then returned to his personal Monastery Dhakpa Namdol Ling in Meldro Gungkar, north of Lhasa, where he took his novice vows and started memorizing his first prayers. When Dhakpa Rinpoche was ten years old he went to Sera Mey Monastic College and spent sixteen years studying Buddhist philosophy. When he was 26 years old he was able to sit for his Geshe examination successfully, and received the highest level attainable, that of Lharampa Geshe. In 1952 Rinpoche joined the Gyuto Tantric College and spent seven years studying all the Tantric rituals receiving the Ngagrampa Degree in Tantric Studies. In 1959 when the Chinese communists took over Tibet, Dhakpa Rinpoche, fled to India. 

In 1962 His Holiness the 14th Dalai Lama appointed Venerable Dhakpa Rinpoche as the Abbot of Sera Mey Monastery, the first Abbot of the Sera Mey Monastery in exile. Rinpoche took his place as an abbot for three years but due to his poor health he had to leave the Monastery and went to northeastern India for medical treatment in Kalimpong. During his stay in Kalimpong many local Tibetans made strong connections with Rinpoche through his spiritual teachings and blessings. Until 1990 Rinpoche led a very quiet life in Kalimpong and spent much of his time in retreat and meditation. Although Rinpoche was one of the most precious and valuable spiritual teachers living in India, due to his humble nature and personal practices, he was little known outside his area. However, he was in fact one of the very rare teachers holding teachings from the most valuable and precious secret lineages which he received from Pabongka Rinpoche and many other highly realized reincarnated Lamas in Tibet. Throughout his life Rinpoche actively sought out teachings from spiritual masters from other Tibetan Buddhist traditions which added to the richness of his understanding and teachings. It became time for him to pass on all these secret lineages to the young Lamas and Geshes before he got too old. Therefore, Rinpoche was requested to pass on all those teachings and other Tantric initiations to the young Rinpoches at Sera Mey Monastery, which he did for three months every winter. His Holiness the Dalai Lama praised Dhakpa Rinpoche for his dedication to his practices and the generosity of his teachings.

Since Rinpoche is one of the Lineage Lamas of the Foundation for the Preservation of the Mahayana Tradition (FPMT), he is naturally one of Cloud Monk‘s secondary Buddha Dharma teachers.

Fair Use Sources: https://fpmt.org/teachers/touring/dhakpa-rinpoche

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Buddhism Glossary, Three Refuges: 1. Buddhas, 2. Dharma: SutrasShastrasVinayaTantras, Buddhist Bibliography, 3. Sangha: BodhisattvasHistoric Buddhist MastersModern Buddhist Masters

Khyongla Rato Rinpoche

Year of Birth: AD

Year of Passing into Parinirvana:

“Khyongla Rato Rinpoche is a reincarnate lama and scholar of the Gelugpa order of Tibetan Buddhism. Rinpoche was born in the Dagyab region of Kham, in southeastern Tibet. In 1928 senior Gelugpa monks divined that a five-year-old boy living in this remote part of Tibet was the reincarnation of the ninth Khyongla. On his sixth birthday monks on horseback took him from his parents home to a monastery some distance away where he was installed as its spiritual head. For over three decades he lived the sober life of a monk, studying at the most famous monasteries in Tibet and earning the Lharampa Geshe degree. In 1959 along with thousands of monks as well as the Dalai Lama, he fled on foot over the Himalayas to safety and to a radically different life in India, Europe and eventually in the United States. In 1975 he founded The Tibet Center, the oldest Tibetan Buddhist Center in New York City, USA.”

Since Rinpoche is one of the Lineage Lamas of the Foundation for the Preservation of the Mahayana Tradition (FPMT), he is naturally one of Cloud Monk‘s secondary Buddha Dharma teachers.

Fair Use Sources: https://fpmt.org/teachers/lineage-lamas/khyongla-rinpoche

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Buddhism Glossary, Three Refuges: 1. Buddhas, 2. Dharma: SutrasShastrasVinayaTantras, Buddhist Bibliography, 3. Sangha: BodhisattvasHistoric Buddhist MastersModern Buddhist Masters

Tulku

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Buddhism Glossary, Three Refuges: 1. Buddhas, 2. Dharma: SutrasShastrasVinayaTantras, Buddhist Bibliography, 3. Sangha: BodhisattvasHistoric Buddhist MastersModern Buddhist Masters

Rinpoche

Rinpoche, also spelled Rimboche and Rinboku (Tibetan: རིན་པོ་ཆེ་, Wylierin po cheTHLRinpochéZYPYRinboqê), is an honorific term used in the Tibetan language. It literally means “precious one”, and may be used to refer to a person, place, or thing–like the words “gem” or “jewel” (Sanskrit Ratna). The word consists of rin(value) and po(nominative suffix) and chen(big).

The word is used in the context of Tibetan Buddhism as a way of showing respect when addressing those recognized as reincarnated, older, respected, notable, learned and/or an accomplished Lamas or teachers of the Dharma. It is also used as an honorific for abbots of monasteries.

For Cloud Monk, the Tibetan language word Rinpoche especially refers to his Gurus such as:

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Buddhism Glossary, Three Refuges: 1. Buddhas, 2. Dharma: SutrasShastrasVinayaTantras, Buddhist Bibliography, 3. Sangha: BodhisattvasHistoric Buddhist MastersModern Buddhist Masters