5th Dalai Lama – Ngawang Lobsang Gyatso – Tibetan ངག་དབང་བློ་བཟང་རྒྱ་མཚོ་ Ngag-dbang blo-bzang rgya-mtsho ཏཱ་ལའི་བླ་མ་ Tā la’i bla ma

5th Dalai Lama – Ngawang Lobsang Gyatso (Tibetan: ངག་དབང་བློ་བཟང་རྒྱ་མཚོ་, Wylie: Ngag-dbang blo-bzang rgya-mtsho; Tibetan pronunciation: [ŋɑ̀wɑ̀ŋ lɔ́psɑ̀ŋ cɑ̀t͡só]; 1617–1682) was the 5th Dalai Lama and the first Dalai Lama to wield effective temporal and spiritual power over all Tibet. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/5th_Dalai_Lama

“Dalai Lama (UK/ˈdælaɪ ˈlɑːmə/US/ˈdɑːlaɪ ˈlɑːmə/;[1][2] Standard Tibetan: ཏཱ་ལའི་བླ་མ་, Tā la’i bla ma, [táːlɛː láma]) is a title given by the Tibetan people for the foremost spiritual leader of the Gelug or “Yellow Hat” school of Tibetan Buddhism, the newest of the classical schools of Tibetan Buddhism.[3]The 14th and current Dalai Lama is Tenzin Gyatso.

The Dalai Lama is also considered to be the successor in a line of tulkus who are believed[2] to be incarnations of Avalokiteśvara,[1] a Bodhisattva of Compassion.[4][5] The name is a combination of the Mongolic word dalai meaning “ocean” or “big” (coming from Mongolian title Dalaiyin qan or Dalaiin khan,[6] translated as Gyatso in Tibetan)[7] and the Tibetan word བླ་མ་ (bla-ma) meaning “master, guru”.[8]

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Buddhism Glossary, Three Refuges: 1. Buddhas, 2. Dharma: SutrasShastrasVinayaTantras, Buddhist Bibliography, 3. Sangha: BodhisattvasHistoric Buddhist MastersModern Buddhist Masters

Dalai Lama – Tibetan ཏཱ་ལའི་བླ་མ་ Tā la’i bla ma

See also with 5th Dalai Lama – Ngawang Lobsang Gyatso (Tibetan: ངག་དབང་བློ་བཟང་རྒྱ་མཚོ་, WylieNgag-dbang blo-bzang rgya-mtsho; Tibetan pronunciation: [ŋɑ̀wɑ̀ŋ lɔ́psɑ̀ŋ cɑ̀t͡só]; 1617–1682) was the 5th Dalai Lama and the first Dalai Lama to wield effective temporal and spiritual power over all Tibet. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/5th_Dalai_Lama

“Dalai Lama (UK/ˈdælaɪ ˈlɑːmə/US/ˈdɑːlaɪ ˈlɑːmə/;[1][2] Standard Tibetan: ཏཱ་ལའི་བླ་མ་, Tā la’i bla ma, [táːlɛː láma]) is a title given by the Tibetan people for the foremost spiritual leader of the Gelug or “Yellow Hat” school of Tibetan Buddhism, the newest of the classical schools of Tibetan Buddhism.[3]The 14th and current Dalai Lama is Tenzin Gyatso.

The Dalai Lama is also considered to be the successor in a line of tulkus who are believed[2] to be incarnations of Avalokiteśvara,[1] a Bodhisattva of Compassion.[4][5] The name is a combination of the Mongolic word dalai meaning “ocean” or “big” (coming from Mongolian title Dalaiyin qan or Dalaiin khan,[6] translated as Gyatso in Tibetan)[7] and the Tibetan word བླ་མ་ (bla-ma) meaning “master, guru”.[8]

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Buddhism Glossary, Three Refuges: 1. Buddhas, 2. Dharma: SutrasShastrasVinayaTantras, Buddhist Bibliography, 3. Sangha: BodhisattvasHistoric Buddhist MastersModern Buddhist Masters

Nalanda Monastery France – part of Foundation for the Preservation Tradition (FPMT)

Nalanda Monastery France – See also Nalanda Monastery Ancient India and Nalanda Tradition

Cloud Monk received his ordination as a Buddhist Monk at Nalanda France with the ordination name of Losang Jinpa.

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Buddhism Glossary, Three Refuges: 1. Buddhas, 2. Dharma: SutrasShastrasVinayaTantras, Buddhist Bibliography, 3. Sangha: BodhisattvasHistoric Buddhist MastersModern Buddhist Masters

Tulku

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Lama

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Buddhism Glossary, Three Refuges: 1. Buddhas, 2. Dharma: SutrasShastrasVinayaTantras, Buddhist Bibliography, 3. Sangha: BodhisattvasHistoric Buddhist MastersModern Buddhist Masters

Geshe

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Buddhism Glossary, Three Refuges: 1. Buddhas, 2. Dharma: SutrasShastrasVinayaTantras, Buddhist Bibliography, 3. Sangha: BodhisattvasHistoric Buddhist MastersModern Buddhist Masters

Rinpoche

Rinpoche, also spelled Rimboche and Rinboku (Tibetan: རིན་པོ་ཆེ་, Wylierin po cheTHLRinpochéZYPYRinboqê), is an honorific term used in the Tibetan language. It literally means “precious one”, and may be used to refer to a person, place, or thing–like the words “gem” or “jewel” (Sanskrit Ratna). The word consists of rin(value) and po(nominative suffix) and chen(big).

The word is used in the context of Tibetan Buddhism as a way of showing respect when addressing those recognized as reincarnated, older, respected, notable, learned and/or an accomplished Lamas or teachers of the Dharma. It is also used as an honorific for abbots of monasteries.

For Cloud Monk, the Tibetan language word Rinpoche especially refers to his Gurus such as:

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Buddhism Glossary, Three Refuges: 1. Buddhas, 2. Dharma: SutrasShastrasVinayaTantras, Buddhist Bibliography, 3. Sangha: BodhisattvasHistoric Buddhist MastersModern Buddhist Masters

Zong Rinpoche

Year of Birth: 19051984

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Buddhism Glossary, Three Refuges: 1. Buddhas, 2. Dharma: SutrasShastrasVinayaTantras, Buddhist Bibliography, 3. Sangha: BodhisattvasHistoric Buddhist MastersModern Buddhist Masters

Lama Thubten Yeshe – Lama Yeshe

Year of Birth: 19351974

The FPMT – Foundation for the Preservation of the Mahayana Tradition was founded by Kyabje Lama Thubten Zopa Rinpoche – Lama Zopa and Lama Yeshe.

“Lama Thubten Yeshe was born in Tibet in 1935 not far from Lhasa in the town of Tölung Dechen. Two hours away by horse was the Chi-me Lung Gompa, home for about 100 nuns of the Gelug tradition. It had been a few years since their learned abbess and guru had passed away when Nenung Pawo Rinpoche, a Kagyü lama widely famed for his psychic powers, came by their convent. They approached him and asked, “Where is our guru now?” He answered that in a nearby village there was a boy born at such and such a time, and if they investigated they would discover that he was their incarnated abbess. Following his advice they found the young Lama Yeshe to whom they brought many offerings and gave the name Thondrub Dorje.” Fair Use Source: https://fpmt.org/teachers/yeshe/jointbio

“Born and educated in Tibet, he fled to India, where he met his chief disciple, Lama Zopa Rinpoche. They began teaching Westerners at Kopan Monastery in 1969 and founded the Foundation for the Preservation of the Mahayana Tradition (FPMT) in 1975.”

Lama Yeshe is one of the many Buddhist Dharma teachers of both Cloud Monk and Cloud Monk’s teacher the Venerable Master Da Xin De Ben Shr.

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Buddhism Glossary, Three Refuges: 1. Buddhas, 2. Dharma: SutrasShastrasVinayaTantras, Buddhist Bibliography, 3. Sangha: BodhisattvasHistoric Buddhist MastersModern Buddhist Masters

Kyabje Lama Thubten Zopa Rinpoche – Lama Zopa

Year of Birth: 1945

Born in Thangme, near Mount Everest, and recognized as the reincarnation (tulku) of the Lawudo Lama, Lama Zopa Rinpoche became the heart disciple of Lama Thubten Yeshe, the founder of the FPMT. He is now its spiritual director.” Fair Use Source: https://lamayeshe.com/glossary/zopa-rinpoche-kyabje-lama-thubten-b-1945

The FPMT – Foundation for the Preservation of the Mahayana Tradition was founded by Kyabje Lama Thubten Zopa Rinpoche – Lama Zopa and Lama Yeshe.

Lama Zopa Rinpoche is one of the many Dharma teachers of both Cloud Monk and Cloud Monk’s teacher the Venerable Master Da Xin De Ben Shr.

For Cloud Monk one of his Root Gurus is Lama Zopa. Others are the Tripitaka Charya Venerable Master Hsuan Hua of the Sagely City of Ten Thousand Buddhas and especially Venerable Da Xin De Ben Shr.

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Buddhism Glossary, Three Refuges: 1. Buddhas, 2. Dharma: SutrasShastrasVinayaTantras, Buddhist Bibliography, 3. Sangha: BodhisattvasHistoric Buddhist MastersModern Buddhist Masters