Three Laws of Robotics

See also Androids in SciFi, AI Glossary, AI Bibliography. The Singularity

“The Three Laws of Robotics (often shortened to The Three Laws or known as Asimov’s Laws) are a set of rules devised by the science fiction author Isaac Asimov. The rules were introduced in his 1942 short story “Runaround” (included in the 1950 collection I, Robot), although they had been foreshadowed in a few earlier stories. The Three Laws, quoted as being from the “Handbook of Robotics, 56th Edition, 2058 A.D.”, are:

  • First Law – A robot may not injure a human being or, through inaction, allow a human being to come to harm.
  • Second Law – A robot must obey the orders given it by human beings except where such orders would conflict with the First Law.
  • Third Law – A robot must protect its own existence as long as such protection does not conflict with the First or Second Laws.[1]
  • Zeroth Law – A robot may not harm humanity, or, by inaction, allow humanity to come to harm.”

“The Three Laws, and the zeroth, have pervaded science fiction and are referred to in many books, films, and other media. They have impacted thought on ethics of artificial intelligence as well.”

Robotics

See also Androids in SciFi, AI Glossary, AI Bibliography, 3 Laws of Robotics

“And how will the machines take over? Is the best, most realistic scenario threatening to us or not? When posed with this question some of the most accomplished scientists I spoke with cited science-fiction writer Isaac Asimov’s Three Laws of Robotics. These rules, they blithely replied, would be “built in” to the AIs, so we have nothing to fear. They spoke as if this were settled science. We’ll discuss the three laws in chapter 1, but it’s enough to say for now that when someone proposes Asimov’s laws as the solution to the dilemma of superintelligent machines, it means they’ve spent little time thinking or exchanging ideas about the problem. How to make friendly intelligent machines and what to fear from superintelligent machines has moved beyond Asimov’s tropes. Being highly capable and accomplished in AI doesn’t inoculate you from naïveté about its perils.

Fair Use Source: B00CQYAWRY

Raspberry Pi Topics

Table of Contents
Title Page
Introduction
How This Book Is Structured
Conventions Used in This Book
What You’ll Need
Errata
Digital Content and Source Code
Part I: Raspberry Pi Basics
Chapter 1: Raspberry Pi Hardware
Introduction to the Platform
RPi Documentation
The RPi Hardware
Raspberry Pi Accessories
HATs
How to Destroy Your RPi!
Summary
Support
Chapter 2: Raspberry Pi Software
Linux on the Raspberry Pi
Connecting to a Network
Communicating with the RPi
Controlling the Raspberry Pi
Configuring the Raspberry Pi
Interacting with the Onboard LEDs
Shutdown and Reboot
Summary
Chapter 3: Exploring Embedded Linux Systems
Introducing Embedded Linux
Managing Linux Systems
Using Git for Version Control
Using Desktop Virtualization
Code for This Book
Summary
Further Reading
Bibliography
Chapter 4: Interfacing Electronics
Analyzing Your Circuits
Basic Circuit Principles
Discrete Components
Logic Gates
Analog-to-Digital Conversion
Concluding Advice
Summary
Further Reading
Chapter 5: Programming on the Raspberry Pi
Introduction
Scripting Languages
Dynamically Compiled Languages
C and C++ on the RPi
Overview of Object-Oriented Programming
Interfacing to the Linux OS
Improving the Performance of Python
Summary
Further Reading
Bibliography
Part II: Interfacing, Controlling, and Communicating
Chapter 6: Interfacing to the Raspberry Pi Input/Outputs
Introduction
General-Purpose Input/Outputs
C++ Control of GPIOs Using sysfs
Memory-Based GPIO Control
WiringPi
GPIOs and Permissions
Summary
Chapter 7: Cross-Compilation and the Eclipse IDE
Setting Up a Cross-Compilation Toolchain
Cross-Compilation Using Eclipse
Building Linux
Summary
Further Reading
Chapter 8: Interfacing to the Raspberry Pi Buses
Introduction to Bus Communication
I2C
SPI
UART
Logic-Level Translation
Summary
Further Reading
Chapter 9: Enhancing the Input/Output Interfaces on the RPi
Introduction
Analog-to-Digital Conversion
Digital-to-Analog Conversion
Adding PWM Outputs to the RPi
Extending the RPi GPIOs
Adding UARTs to the RPi
Summary
Chapter 10: Interacting with the Physical Environment
Interfacing to Actuators
Interfacing to Analog Sensors
Interfacing to Local Displays
Building C/C++ Libraries
Summary
Chapter 11: Real-Time Interfacing Using the Arduino
The Arduino
An Arduino Serial Slave
An Arduino I2C Slave
An Arduino SPI Slave
Programming the Arduino from the RPi Command Line
Summary
Part III: Advanced Interfacing and Interaction
Chapter 12: The Internet of Things
The Internet of Things (IoT)
The RPi as an IoT Sensor
The RPi as a Sensor Web Server
A C/C++ Web Client
The RPi as a “Thing”
Large-Scale IoT Frameworks
The C++ Client/Server
IoT Device Management
Summary
Chapter 13: Wireless Communication and Control
Introduction to Wireless Communications
Bluetooth Communications
Wi-Fi Communications
ZigBee Communications
Near Field Communication
Summary
Chapter 14: Raspberry Pi with a Rich User Interface
Rich UI RPi Architectures
Rich UI Application Development
Qt Primer
Remote UI Application Development
Summary
Further Reading
Chapter 15: Images, Video, and Audio
Capturing Images and Video
Streaming Video
Image Processing and Computer Vision
Raspberry Pi Audio
Summary
Further Reading
Chapter 16: Kernel Programming
Introduction
A First LKM Example
An Embedded LKM Example
Enhanced Button GPIO Driver LKM
Enhanced LED GPIO Driver LKM
Conclusions
Summary
End User License Agreement
Table of Contents
Title Page
Introduction
How This Book Is Structured
Conventions Used in This Book
What You’ll Need
Errata
Digital Content and Source Code
Part I: Raspberry Pi Basics
Chapter 1: Raspberry Pi Hardware
Introduction to the Platform
RPi Documentation
The RPi Hardware
Raspberry Pi Accessories
HATs
How to Destroy Your RPi!
Summary
Support
Chapter 2: Raspberry Pi Software
Linux on the Raspberry Pi
Connecting to a Network
Communicating with the RPi
Controlling the Raspberry Pi
Configuring the Raspberry Pi
Interacting with the Onboard LEDs
Shutdown and Reboot
Summary
Chapter 3: Exploring Embedded Linux Systems
Introducing Embedded Linux
Managing Linux Systems
Using Git for Version Control
Using Desktop Virtualization
Code for This Book
Summary
Further Reading
Bibliography
Chapter 4: Interfacing Electronics
Analyzing Your Circuits
Basic Circuit Principles
Discrete Components
Logic Gates
Analog-to-Digital Conversion
Concluding Advice
Summary
Further Reading
Chapter 5: Programming on the Raspberry Pi
Introduction
Scripting Languages
Dynamically Compiled Languages
C and C++ on the RPi
Overview of Object-Oriented Programming
Interfacing to the Linux OS
Improving the Performance of Python
Summary
Further Reading
Bibliography
Part II: Interfacing, Controlling, and Communicating
Chapter 6: Interfacing to the Raspberry Pi Input/Outputs
Introduction
General-Purpose Input/Outputs
C++ Control of GPIOs Using sysfs
Memory-Based GPIO Control
WiringPi
GPIOs and Permissions
Summary
Chapter 7: Cross-Compilation and the Eclipse IDE
Setting Up a Cross-Compilation Toolchain
Cross-Compilation Using Eclipse
Building Linux
Summary
Further Reading
Chapter 8: Interfacing to the Raspberry Pi Buses
Introduction to Bus Communication
I2C
SPI
UART
Logic-Level Translation
Summary
Further Reading
Chapter 9: Enhancing the Input/Output Interfaces on the RPi
Introduction
Analog-to-Digital Conversion
Digital-to-Analog Conversion
Adding PWM Outputs to the RPi
Extending the RPi GPIOs
Adding UARTs to the RPi
Summary
Chapter 10: Interacting with the Physical Environment
Interfacing to Actuators
Interfacing to Analog Sensors
Interfacing to Local Displays
Building C/C++ Libraries
Summary
Chapter 11: Real-Time Interfacing Using the Arduino
The Arduino
An Arduino Serial Slave
An Arduino I2C Slave
An Arduino SPI Slave
Programming the Arduino from the RPi Command Line
Summary
Part III: Advanced Interfacing and Interaction
Chapter 12: The Internet of Things
The Internet of Things (IoT)
The RPi as an IoT Sensor
The RPi as a Sensor Web Server
A C/C++ Web Client
The RPi as a “Thing”
Large-Scale IoT Frameworks
The C++ Client/Server
IoT Device Management
Summary
Chapter 13: Wireless Communication and Control
Introduction to Wireless Communications
Bluetooth Communications
Wi-Fi Communications
ZigBee Communications
Near Field Communication
Summary
Chapter 14: Raspberry Pi with a Rich User Interface
Rich UI RPi Architectures
Rich UI Application Development
Qt Primer
Remote UI Application Development
Summary
Further Reading
Chapter 15: Images, Video, and Audio
Capturing Images and Video
Streaming Video
Image Processing and Computer Vision
Raspberry Pi Audio
Summary
Further Reading
Chapter 16: Kernel Programming
Introduction
A First LKM Example
An Embedded LKM Example
Enhanced Button GPIO Driver LKM
Enhanced LED GPIO Driver LKM
Conclusions
Summary
End User License Agreement

Big Brother

See the Surveillance State of Facebook, Twitter and Google the Googlag (Google as Big Brother) who censor and shadow ban anyone who dares not to follow the Party Line of the New GroupThink.

Big Brother n. [after Big Brother, the head of state in George Orwell’s novel Nineteen Eighty-Four] an all-powerful, all-seeing, authoritarian ruler or government.”

  • “1949 [G. Orwell] Nineteen Eighty-Four 209: One could infer […] the general structure of Oceanic society. At the apex of the pyramid comes Big Brother. Big Brother is infallible and all-powerful […]. Nobody has ever seen Big Brother. He is a face on the hoardings, a voice on the telescreen.”
  • “1957 Economist (Oct.) 208/2: The reporting to the Privy Council of any evidence discovered by this court of “misconduct in the administration of security organisations” would usefully discourage the Big Brother mentality.”
  • “1968 B. Bettelheim Saturday Evening Post (July 27) 9/2: Neither a medieval absence of privacy nor a Big Brother’s spying that leaves nothing unpublic will do.”
  • “2005 Times of India, Pune (June 24) 5/5: Mumbai University is taking up the role of big brother and will soon tell students what to wear and what not to wear to college.”

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