Sound Hearer – Shravaka Śrāvaka श्रावक – Pali Savaka Sāvaka – Tibetan nyan-thos – 聲聞 Shēngwén – Vietnamese Thanh-văn

Sound Hearer – Shravaka Śrāvaka श्रावक – Pali Savaka Sāvaka – Tibetan nyan-thos – 聲聞 Pinyin Shēngwén – Vietnamese Thanh-văn

VenerableŚrāvaka (Sanskrit) or Sāvaka (Pali) means “hearer” or, more generally, “disciple” In Buddhism, the term is sometimes reserved for distinguished disciples of the Buddha” Shakyamuni. Fair Use Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sound_Hearer

“A Hinayana practitioner that strives toward liberation as an arhat based on listening to the teachings of the Buddha. Literally, “listeners” to Buddha’s teachings – practitioners of the Hinayana vehicle who, motivated by renunciation, strive to attain liberation from uncontrollably recurring rebirth (samsara) and to become an arhat (liberated being) of either the shravaka or pratyekabuddha class. They practice, based on having listened to Buddha’s teachings. Some translators render the term as “hearer.” Fair Use Source: https://studybuddhism.com/en/glossary/shravaka

Arhat

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Buddhism Glossary, Three Refuges: 1. Buddhas, 2. Dharma: SutrasShastrasVinayaTantras, Buddhist Bibliography, 3. Sangha: BodhisattvasHistoric Buddhist MastersModern Buddhist Masters

Venerable Arhat Shariputra – Śāriputra – Pali Sāriputta – 舎利弗 Shèlìfú – Xá Lợi Phất

Venerable Arhat Shariputra – Sariputra – Śāriputra – Pali Sāriputta Sariputta – 舎利弗 Pinyin Shèlìfú – Vietnamese Xá Lợi Phất

VenerableSāriputta (Pali) or Śāriputra (Sanskrit) was one of two chief male disciples of Gautama Buddha along with Moggallāna (Maudgalyayana), counterparts to the bhikkhunis Khema and Uppalavanna, his two chief female disciples. He became an Arhat renowned for his teaching and is depicted in the Theravada tradition as one of the most important disciples of the Buddha. Sariputta is regarded as the disciple of the Buddha who was foremost in wisdom. ” Fair Use Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sariputta

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Buddhism Glossary, Three Refuges: 1. Buddhas, 2. Dharma: SutrasShastrasVinayaTantras, Buddhist Bibliography, 3. Sangha: BodhisattvasHistoric Buddhist MastersModern Buddhist Masters

Naropa – Nāropā – Nāropadā – Naḍapāda – Abhayakirti Mahasiddha

AryaNāropā (Sanskrit: Nāropadā[1], Naḍapāda[2] or Abhayakirti[3]) was an Indian Buddhist Mahasiddha. He was the disciple of Tilopa and brother, or some sources say partner and pupil, of Niguma.[4] As an Indian Mahasiddha, Naropa’s instructions inform Vajrayana, particularly his six yogas of Naropa relevant to the completion stage of anuttarayogatantra.

Although some accounts relate that Naropa was the personal teacher of Marpa Lotsawa, other accounts suggest that Marpa held Naropa’s lineage through intermediary disciples only.[5]

Arhat

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Buddhism Glossary, Three Refuges: 1. Buddhas, 2. Dharma: SutrasShastrasVinayaTantras, Buddhist Bibliography, 3. Sangha: BodhisattvasHistoric Buddhist MastersModern Buddhist Masters

Venerable Moggaliputtatissa

VenerableMoggaliputtatissa (ca. 327–247 BC), was a Buddhist monk and scholar who was born in PataliputraMagadha (now PatnaIndia) and lived in the 3rd century BC. He is associated with the Third Buddhist council, the emperor Ashoka and the Buddhist missionary activities which took place during his reign.[1]Fair Use Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Moggaliputta-Tissa

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Year of Birth: 327 BC

Year of Passing into Parinirvana: 247 BC

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Buddhism Glossary, Three Refuges: 1. Buddhas, 2. Dharma: SutrasShastrasVinayaTantras, Buddhist Bibliography, 3. Sangha: BodhisattvasHistoric Buddhist MastersModern Buddhist Masters

Venerable Malanadna – Mālānanda – Marananta – Kumāranandin

Venerable Mālānanda (Marananta in Korean) was a Buddhist monk from Gandhara,[1][2] in modern day Pakistan, who brought Buddhism to the southern Korean Peninsula in the fourth century CE. Multiple romanizations of Mālānanda’s name may be found, including MaranantaMaranant’a and Maalaananda. An alternative reconstruction of his name is Kumāranandin.[3] He was among the first to bring Buddhism to the Korean Peninsula. The Samgungnyusa records him as the one who brought Buddhism to Baekje, along with Sundo in Goguryeo and Ado in Silla.[4]

Arhats.

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Buddhism Glossary, Three Refuges: 1. Buddhas, 2. Dharma: SutrasShastrasVinayaTantras, Buddhist Bibliography, 3. Sangha: BodhisattvasHistoric Buddhist MastersModern Buddhist Masters

Buddhist Emperor Ashoka the Great – Aśoka

See also Venerable Mahinda Mahendra Maurya – Son of Emperor Ashoka

Ashoka (English: /əˈʃoʊkə/IAST: Aśoka, Brāhmi: 𑀅𑀲𑁄𑀓, Asoka),[5] sometimes Ashoka the Great, was an Indian emperor of the Maurya Dynasty, who ruled almost all of the Indian subcontinent from c. 268 to 232 BCE.[6][7] The grandson of the founder of the Maurya Dynasty, Chandragupta Maurya, Ashoka promoted the spread of Buddhism across ancient Asia. Considered by many to be one of India’s greatest emperors, Ashoka expanded Chandragupta’s empire to reign over a realm stretching from present-day Afghanistan in the west to Bangladesh in the east. 

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Fair Use Sources: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ashoka

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Buddhism Glossary, Three Refuges: 1. Buddhas, 2. Dharma: SutrasShastrasVinayaTantras, Buddhist Bibliography, 3. Sangha: BodhisattvasHistoric Buddhist MastersModern Buddhist Masters

Venerable Mahinda Mahendra Maurya – Son of Emperor Ashoka

See also Buddhist Emperor Ashoka the Great – Aśoka

Mahinda (born as Mahendra Maurya) was a Buddhist monk depicted in Buddhist sources as bringing Buddhism to Sri Lanka.[1] He was the first-born son of the Mauryan emperor Ashoka from his wife Devi and the elder brother of Sanghamitra.

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Fair Use Sources: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mahinda_(Buddhist_monk)

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Buddhism Glossary, Three Refuges: 1. Buddhas, 2. Dharma: SutrasShastrasVinayaTantras, Buddhist Bibliography, 3. Sangha: BodhisattvasHistoric Buddhist MastersModern Buddhist Masters

Mahadeva – Mahādeva महादेव – 大天 Dàtiān

Mahādeva (Sanskrit: महादेव; Chinese: 大天; pinyin: Dàtiān)

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Fair Use Sources: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mahadeva_(Buddhism)

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Buddhism Glossary, Three Refuges: 1. Buddhas, 2. Dharma: SutrasShastrasVinayaTantras, Buddhist Bibliography, 3. Sangha: BodhisattvasHistoric Buddhist MastersModern Buddhist Masters

Lokakshema – Lokakṣema लोकक्षेम – 支婁迦讖 Zhī Lóujiāchèn

Lokakṣema (लोकक्षेम, Chinese: 支婁迦讖; pinyin: Zhī Lóujiāchèn)

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Fair Use Sources: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lokaksema_(Buddhist_monk)

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Buddhism Glossary, Three Refuges: 1. Buddhas, 2. Dharma: SutrasShastrasVinayaTantras, Buddhist Bibliography, 3. Sangha: BodhisattvasHistoric Buddhist MastersModern Buddhist Masters

Kumarayana – Kumārāyana – Kiu-mo-yen

Kumārāyana (also Kiu-mo-yen)

Arhats.

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Fair Use Sources: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kumarayana

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Buddhism Glossary, Three Refuges: 1. Buddhas, 2. Dharma: SutrasShastrasVinayaTantras, Buddhist Bibliography, 3. Sangha: BodhisattvasHistoric Buddhist MastersModern Buddhist Masters