Chan Masters – Historic Chinese Buddhist Zen Meditation Masters

  • Arya Venerable Xuyun – Chan Master Xu Yun – 虛雲《禪師》

Year of Birth:

Year of Passing into Parinirvana:

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Arya Master Hui Neng the Sixth Patriarch of Chinese Chan Buddhism, Tripitaka Charya Venerable Master Hsuan Hua

Buddhism Glossary, Three Refuges: 1. Buddhas, 2. Dharma: SutrasShastrasVinayaTantras, Buddhist Bibliography, 3. Sangha: BodhisattvasHistoric Buddhist MastersModern Buddhist Masters

Arya Venerable Xuyun – Chan Master Xu Yun – Hsu Yun – 虛雲《禪師》

Arya Venerable XuyunChan Master Xu Yun – 虛雲《禪師》

Year of Birth:

Year of Passing into Parinirvana: 1959

Venerable Da Xin De Ben Shr has a particularly close connection with Master Hsu Yun.

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Arya Master Hui Neng the Sixth Patriarch of Chinese Chan Buddhism, Tripitaka Charya Venerable Master Hsuan Hua

Buddhism Glossary, Three Refuges: 1. Buddhas, 2. Dharma: SutrasShastrasVinayaTantras, Buddhist Bibliography, 3. Sangha: BodhisattvasHistoric Buddhist MastersModern Buddhist Masters

! Template for Historic Chinese Buddhist Masters

Year of Birth:

Year of Passing into Parinirvana:

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Arya Master Hui Neng the Sixth Patriarch of Chinese Chan Buddhism, Tripitaka Charya Venerable Master Hsuan Hua

Buddhism Glossary, Three Refuges: 1. Buddhas, 2. Dharma: SutrasShastrasVinayaTantras, Buddhist Bibliography, 3. Sangha: BodhisattvasHistoric Buddhist MastersModern Buddhist Masters

Tibetan Buddhism – Mahayana – Vajrayana-Mantrayāna-Tantrayana – Tantric Buddhist Vehicle

Tibetan Buddhism – Mahayana – Vajrayana-Mantrayāna-Tantrayana – Tantric Buddhist Vehicle

See also Vajrayana – Vajrayāna वज्रयान – Mantrayāna-Tantrayana – Tantric Buddhism Secret Mantra Diamond Vehicle – Tibetan rdo-rje theg-pa – Mìjiao – Mìzōng Esoteric Tradition – Tiếng Việt: Kim cương thừa

Fair Use Sources: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vajrayana

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Buddhism Glossary, Three Refuges: 1. Buddhas, 2. Dharma: SutrasShastrasVinayaTantras, Buddhist Bibliography, 3. Sangha: BodhisattvasHistoric Buddhist MastersModern Buddhist Masters

5th Dalai Lama – Ngawang Lobsang Gyatso – Tibetan ངག་དབང་བློ་བཟང་རྒྱ་མཚོ་ Ngag-dbang blo-bzang rgya-mtsho ཏཱ་ལའི་བླ་མ་ Tā la’i bla ma

5th Dalai Lama – Ngawang Lobsang Gyatso (Tibetan: ངག་དབང་བློ་བཟང་རྒྱ་མཚོ་, Wylie: Ngag-dbang blo-bzang rgya-mtsho; Tibetan pronunciation: [ŋɑ̀wɑ̀ŋ lɔ́psɑ̀ŋ cɑ̀t͡só]; 1617–1682) was the 5th Dalai Lama and the first Dalai Lama to wield effective temporal and spiritual power over all Tibet. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/5th_Dalai_Lama

“Dalai Lama (UK/ˈdælaɪ ˈlɑːmə/US/ˈdɑːlaɪ ˈlɑːmə/;[1][2] Standard Tibetan: ཏཱ་ལའི་བླ་མ་, Tā la’i bla ma, [táːlɛː láma]) is a title given by the Tibetan people for the foremost spiritual leader of the Gelug or “Yellow Hat” school of Tibetan Buddhism, the newest of the classical schools of Tibetan Buddhism.[3]The 14th and current Dalai Lama is Tenzin Gyatso.

The Dalai Lama is also considered to be the successor in a line of tulkus who are believed[2] to be incarnations of Avalokiteśvara,[1] a Bodhisattva of Compassion.[4][5] The name is a combination of the Mongolic word dalai meaning “ocean” or “big” (coming from Mongolian title Dalaiyin qan or Dalaiin khan,[6] translated as Gyatso in Tibetan)[7] and the Tibetan word བླ་མ་ (bla-ma) meaning “master, guru”.[8]

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Buddhism Glossary, Three Refuges: 1. Buddhas, 2. Dharma: SutrasShastrasVinayaTantras, Buddhist Bibliography, 3. Sangha: BodhisattvasHistoric Buddhist MastersModern Buddhist Masters

Dalai Lama – Tibetan ཏཱ་ལའི་བླ་མ་ Tā la’i bla ma

See also with 5th Dalai Lama – Ngawang Lobsang Gyatso (Tibetan: ངག་དབང་བློ་བཟང་རྒྱ་མཚོ་, WylieNgag-dbang blo-bzang rgya-mtsho; Tibetan pronunciation: [ŋɑ̀wɑ̀ŋ lɔ́psɑ̀ŋ cɑ̀t͡só]; 1617–1682) was the 5th Dalai Lama and the first Dalai Lama to wield effective temporal and spiritual power over all Tibet. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/5th_Dalai_Lama

“Dalai Lama (UK/ˈdælaɪ ˈlɑːmə/US/ˈdɑːlaɪ ˈlɑːmə/;[1][2] Standard Tibetan: ཏཱ་ལའི་བླ་མ་, Tā la’i bla ma, [táːlɛː láma]) is a title given by the Tibetan people for the foremost spiritual leader of the Gelug or “Yellow Hat” school of Tibetan Buddhism, the newest of the classical schools of Tibetan Buddhism.[3]The 14th and current Dalai Lama is Tenzin Gyatso.

The Dalai Lama is also considered to be the successor in a line of tulkus who are believed[2] to be incarnations of Avalokiteśvara,[1] a Bodhisattva of Compassion.[4][5] The name is a combination of the Mongolic word dalai meaning “ocean” or “big” (coming from Mongolian title Dalaiyin qan or Dalaiin khan,[6] translated as Gyatso in Tibetan)[7] and the Tibetan word བླ་མ་ (bla-ma) meaning “master, guru”.[8]

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Buddhism Glossary, Three Refuges: 1. Buddhas, 2. Dharma: SutrasShastrasVinayaTantras, Buddhist Bibliography, 3. Sangha: BodhisattvasHistoric Buddhist MastersModern Buddhist Masters

Nalanda Tradition Sanskrit Buddhism Lineage from the Ancient Indian Monastery Monastic University College

See also Nalanda Monastery France, Nalanda Monastery Ancient India

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Buddhism Glossary, Three Refuges: 1. Buddhas, 2. Dharma: SutrasShastrasVinayaTantras, Buddhist Bibliography, 3. Sangha: BodhisattvasHistoric Buddhist MastersModern Buddhist Masters

Nalanda Monastery in Ancient India

See also Nalanda Monastery France, and Nalanda Tradition

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Buddhism Glossary, Three Refuges: 1. Buddhas, 2. Dharma: SutrasShastrasVinayaTantras, Buddhist Bibliography, 3. Sangha: BodhisattvasHistoric Buddhist MastersModern Buddhist Masters

Nalanda Monastery France – part of Foundation for the Preservation Tradition (FPMT)

Nalanda Monastery France – See also Nalanda Monastery Ancient India and Nalanda Tradition

Cloud Monk received his ordination as a Buddhist Monk at Nalanda France with the ordination name of Losang Jinpa.

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Buddhism Glossary, Three Refuges: 1. Buddhas, 2. Dharma: SutrasShastrasVinayaTantras, Buddhist Bibliography, 3. Sangha: BodhisattvasHistoric Buddhist MastersModern Buddhist Masters

Kadam sect of Tibetan Vajrayana Buddhism tradition – Tibetan bKa’-gdams – Atisha Ga-dam school lineage – 噶当派 Gá dāng pài

New Kadam sect of Tibetan Vajrayana Buddhism tradition – Tibetan bKa’-gdams – Atisha Ga-dam school lineage – 噶当派 Gá dāng pài

“One of the New Translation Period traditions of Tibetan Buddhism, deriving from Atisha’s visit to Tibet. After its branches were merged and reformed, it continued as the Gelugpa tradition.” Fair Use Source: https://studybuddhism.com/en/glossary/kadam

The Kadam school (Tibetan: བཀའ་གདམས་པ་, Wyliebka’ gdams pa) of Tibetan Buddhism was founded by Dromtön (1005–1064), a Tibetan lay master and the foremost disciple of the great Bengali master Atiśa(982-1054). The Kadampa were quite famous and respected for their proper and earnest Dharmapractice. The most evident teachings of that tradition were the teachings on bodhicitta. Later, these special presentations became known as lojong and lamrim by Atiśa.

Kadam instructional influence lingered long after the school disappeared:

The Bka’ gdams was responsible for the distinctive Tibetan Bstan rim (tenrim) (“stages of teaching”) genre, based on Atiśa’s seminal work, the Bodhipathapradīpa. This genre was later adapted and popularized by Tsong kha pa in his influential Lam rim chen mo.[1]

Fair Use Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kadam_(Tibetan_Buddhism)

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Buddhism Glossary, Three Refuges: 1. Buddhas, 2. Dharma: SutrasShastrasVinayaTantras, Buddhist Bibliography, 3. Sangha: BodhisattvasHistoric Buddhist MastersModern Buddhist Masters